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Follow The Tale of Peter Rabbit
to the Lake District| Beatrix Potter
One of the most enchanting children’s stories of all time, Beatrix Potter’s most famous creation is still much loved, over 100 years later.
THINGS TO SEE AND DO
Beatrix Potter purchased this idyllic 17th-century farmhouse with the proceeds from the publication of The Tale of Peter Rabbit. High in the hills to the west of Lake Windermere, the garden and the landscape beyond is said to have inspired many of her following works.
In the popular lakeside town of Bowness-on-Windermere, this charming theme park features many attractions for Potter fans - including a beautiful Peter Rabbit garden, not to mention a particularly good tearoom. Bowness is one of the region’s most popular tourist destinations - there are many opportunities to take to the waters of Windermere here, from luxury leisure cruises to the car ferry towards Sawrey and Hill Top.
Beatrix Potter spent many childhood summer holidays on the shores of this lake, staying at the houses of Fawe Park and Lingholm - the vegetable garden of the latter inspired Mr McGregor’s own plot in Peter Rabbit. While the houses are not presently open to the public, there are plenty of Potter connections to explore; follow in her footsteps and climb the beautiful fell of Catbells on the lake’s western shore or visit the nearby Newlands Valley, the setting of The Tale of Mrs Tiggywinkle.
DID YOU KNOW?
  • The character of Peter Rabbit is inspired by and named after a childhood pet of Potter called Peter Piper.
  • Potter was also a noted conservationist, passionate about protecting the landscape of the Lake District, as well as a successful farmer, specialising in the breeding of sheep.
  • When Beatrix Potter died in 1943, she left Hill Top to the National Trust, on the strict proviso that it be left completely untouched. What you see today is exactly what Potter would have seen when she lived there.
TOP TIP
From Hill Top, the nearby village of Hawkshead is perfect for a lunchtime stopover, or even as a place to stay. No cars are allowed in the village, but the main street is packed with historic inns and local independent gift shops, as well as an art gallery of Potter’s illustrations.
Get the latest Lake District hotel deals here. For more inspiration, check out Travelzoo's interactive guide, 101 Things to do in the Lake District.
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